How To Put A Collar On Your Cat? Here’s The Answer

Though it’s a clever saying, cats and collars aren’t as often connected as, say, dogs and collars, right? “Should I put a collar on my cat?” you might be thinking to yourself. The answer is straightforward: it depends!

While there is no one-size-fits-all solution, many cat owners choose to use collars, while others do not. The decision to put a collar on your cat is entirely up to you and your feline’s wants.

We’ll talk about whether or not you should put a collar on your cat in this article. We’ll also give you some tips on how to help your cat get used to wearing a collar (if necessary).

How To Put A Collar On Your Cat

How To Put A Collar On Your Cat

Putting a collar on your cat might be intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. We’ve helped thousands of cats all around the globe discover the delights of wearing cat collars here at Supakit, and we’d love to share what we’ve learned with you. Here’s our easy step-by-step method to getting your cat to joyfully wear a collar in no time…

We’ve created this tutorial to apply to any breakaway cat collars, but if you want to increase your chances, we recommend using our ultra-soft breakaway cat collars (they’re super lightweight and pleasant, so your cat won’t even realize they’re wearing one!)

Get relaxed

The first step is to relax and take a big breath, so that your cat can calm as well. If your inner monologue tells you that you’re a horrible cat parent for disturbing your cat’s peace and quiet with the arrival of a new collar, remember that fitting your cat with a collar and ID tag is one of the most critical things you can do to keep your cat safe.

Strip the collar back

To begin, take anything dangling from the collar and remove it. This includes everything other than the collar’s simple band, such as bells, identifying tags, and charms.

You may progressively introduce such things once your cat has become accustomed to wearing a collar. But first and foremost, let’s keep things simple.

Open the collar up

Then, unbuckle your cat’s collar. You’ll do this with a breakaway collar by pushing the band firmly apart on either side of the breakaway buckle.

Adjust the collar length

Adjust the length of your Supakit collar if it is adjustable (all Supakit collars are), so it is in the proper ballpark for your cat – see below.

If your cat is changing collars, you can base your measurements on that one. If this is your cat’s first collar, you may measure their neck with your fingertips while caressing them and use it as a rough reference when changing the length of the collar.

The ideal match: Supakit collars are made to fit snugly around your cat’s neck. When the collar is on, you should be able to pass one fingertip between your cat’s body and the collar (flat to your cat). In step 9, we’ll go through the optimal fit in more detail.

Gather some treats

Gather a few delectable snacks, such as cooked chicken, cheese, or our homemade tuna cat treats… anything it takes to capture your cat’s attention. You’re now ready to go!

First encounters

How To Put A Collar On Your Cat

Allow your cat to check the collar by holding it up a short distance away.

How did it turn out?

My cat was completely uninterested in the collar.

It’s fantastic if your cat is calm in the presence of the collar. You can go to the next step right now.

My cat has given the collar a thorough examination.

Perfect – move on to the following stage after your cat has thoroughly examined the collar. They may try to claw at the collar or toy with it. If they do, don’t let go of the collar. Just keep going until you reach step 7.

Putting your cat’s collar on

Put yourself in a situation where your cat is facing you directly. I realize this is a stupid statement because a cat’s odds of remaining motionless for even a second are limited. But give it your all!

Then, holding the collar’s far ends in each hand, put the collar under your cat’s chin and WHOOP! do it up at the top as quickly as possible.

This maneuver will require some practice, so don’t be discouraged if you make a mistake at first.

How did it turn out?

Success! We’ve got the collar on, which is fantastic! You’re all set to go on to the next phase.

My cat is always fleeing.

If your cat continues escaping, you can have someone hold them in their arms while you put on their collar (still approaching them from the front).

Take your cues from your feline companion.

Picking them up AND introducing a collar is unlikely to work well if they have a deathly fear of being picked up. If they don’t mind being held, on the other hand, this could be a better alternative!

Take stock

Take a time to observe how your cat reacts to their new collar.

What are their emotions?

My cat is completely unconcernedGreat! Give them something pleasant to eat before moving on to the next phase.

My cat is staring at me with a death glare!

At this point, it’s pretty normal to be met with a kitten death gaze. Don’t worry, it’s only temporary! It’s simply your cat expressing how much it despises having to figure out how it feels about new situations. This is an excellent moment to give your cat their treat and lavish praise on them. Continue to the following step after their death look begins to relax.

My cat is having a horrible reaction to their collar. It’s unsettling, but it’s not uncommon for a cat to respond to a new collar by rushing about like a maniac, rolling around on the floor, or pawing at it. Allow them to do everything; it’s all part of the screening process. Don’t run over, thinking to yourself, “I’m the worst cat parent in the world,” and yank the collar back on. Just keep an eye on them and wait for them to settle down. When you sense that they’re on the verge of making a mental judgment about whether this collar belongs in the ‘OK’ or ‘NOT OK’ mental box, it’s time to deploy the rewards! Give your cat some of the delectable delicacies you’ve gathered, and watch their suspicion melt away. ‘Oh, this collar comes with goodies, right?’ ‘All right, then…’

Check the fit

How To Put A Collar On Your Cat

Give your cat a gentle rub to convince them that everything is OK, and check their collar while you’re at it. Check to see if any of their fur got caught in the buckle as you put it on (if you did, just unclasp it and do it straight back up again, taking care to clear their fur out of the way).

Check the fit as well; remember, you only want one fingertip to be able to pass between your cat’s body and their collar. If the fit isn’t quite perfect, try estimating how much longer/shorter the collar needs to be, then take it off, modify, and put it back on using the same procedure as before.

Make sure your kitty is properly fitted.

A tight fit is vital for safety (it prevents snagging and ensures that your cat’s collar does not end up in their mouth). But it’s also more comfortable for your cat! Any feelings of the collar moving across their fur are reduced with a well fitting collar.

Build up time in the collar

My cat is having a horrible reaction to their collar. It’s unsettling, but it’s not uncommon for a cat to respond to a new collar by rushing about like a maniac, rolling around on the floor, or pawing at it. Allow them to do everything; it’s all part of the screening process. Don’t run over, thinking to yourself, “I’m the worst cat parent in the world,” and yank the collar back on. Just keep an eye on them and wait for them to settle down. When you sense that they’re on the verge of making a mental judgment about whether this collar belongs in the ‘OK’ or ‘NOT OK’ mental box, it’s time to deploy the rewards! Give your cat some of the delectable delicacies you’ve gathered, and watch their suspicion melt away. ‘Oh, this collar comes with goodies, right?’ ‘All right, then…’

Some Important Tips

It ought to be a nice match. It should ideally adhere to the feline’s skin. However, it should not be so tight that it restricts breathing or movement. You should be able to slide a single finger around the screen without difficulty.

Consider applying a pheromone spray if your cat feels uncomfortable with it and refuses to wear it no matter what. The aroma will help you relax.

Collar training is much easier with timely rewards, since they assist your cat get adjusted to the accessory faster.

Both indoor and outdoor cats should use this product. It’s also beneficial to have a unique ID and a microchip.

Breakaway collars break when they get trapped in anything, so having a spare is a good idea.

The size adjustment for developing kittens must be examined on a frequent basis in order to effectively accommodate growth.

Consider utilizing a microchip or seeking expert assistance if your pet buddy refuses to wear.

With the collar on, never let your cat alone. When you’re not around, take it down. When your cat gets acclimated to it, you may leave it on for extended periods of time.

Conclusion

Always keep an eye on your cat’s behavior when introducing a new collar. It’s also possible that your cat will try to bite it off. It’s really difficult for them to get their jaw dislodged, so keep an eye on your cat’s new collar at all times. Yoda’s mouth got caught in his collar once, but luckily I was observing him at the time and came to his rescue!

FAQ

It’s natural to want to make sure your cat is safe and can find their way back to you if they get lost, but we don’t recommend putting a collar on your cat. Unlike dogs, cats have something called a ‘right to roam’. This means, if you have an outdoor cat, they can pretty much go wherever they want.
By light – I mean a very light-weight fabric or material. You could also try putting the collar on and then stimulating him with his favorite toys and “distracting” him while he has it on. You can also try to distract him by placing it on him just before feeding him with some of his favorite canned food.
Experts say you should put a collar on your kitten as soon as she’s ready to explore the world around her. This would be around the time when she’s 2 to 6 months old. The more important factor here is her weight and the size of her neck as these will determine the fit of the collar.
While fears that cats can become strangled or trapped by a collar caught on debris are common, actual adverse effects from collars are rare. One study looked at 107 veterinarian practices and found only one collar-related injury per every 2.3 years, with collar-related deaths being even rarer.
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